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    Moggi: Malta rest your mind, I’m illiterate and won’t vote

    In the past few days news travelled fast that Luciano Moggi, the former general manager of Italian giants Juventus, is eligible to vote in Malta’s local elections. Oh, what a Rooaarr that was, bigger to any Juventus Champions League win.

    All Malta turned patriotic in just a matter of hours especially anti-Juventus supporters. Some took this matter at heart and decided to start a petition with the intent to send it to Malta’s Archbishop Charles Jude Scicluna since he seems to have good contacts around. Having such an outspoken Archbishop, people from all around Malta are expecting him to speak out about the matter.

    For those who are not familiar with Mr Moggi, he’s the guy that had been handed a life ban by the Italian football federation and sentenced to prison for his role in calciopoli. Half Italy hates him. The other half don’t know what to think.

    Seeing all this outrage Mr Moggi decided to issue a statement about the matter. In his explanation, Moggi said that it was not his intention to upset the Maltese people with his stay on the island.

    “I came to Malta because I don’t feel comfortable in my own country. I decided to get the Malta’s residence because from grapevine I hear that you are good people and that any immigrants are welcome,” explained an impassioned Moggi.

    His statement read “We all know about the disputes between Italy and Malta because of immigrants at sea. Malta always tackles the issue wisely. After evaluating all my options, I felt that Malta would be the ideal place for me to have a second chance at life.

    It happens that I have the right to vote too. I wasn’t even aware of that. People jump into conclusions. What they don’t know is that I am illiterate. I am so illiterate that I cannot use technology. People seem to have forgotten that now Malta’s voting is electronic. So how am I supposed to vote?” said Moggi.

    What they don’t know is that I am illiterate. I am so illiterate that I cannot use technology. People seem to have forgotten that now Malta’s voting is electronic. So how am I supposed to vote?” said Moggi.

    Moggi was initially sentenced to five years and four months in prison, reduced to two years and four months on appeal. Somehow, the sentence was cancelled completely in 2015 when the charges were dropped, even though he was not acquitted.

    Seeing that his address was made somewhat public, Moggi invited the Maltese public to his house so he can give them advice on how to not abide by the law and not get caught.

    That apart, disgraced Moggi said that since Malta believed in second chances, he was ready to give Maltese football a push even on an international level.

    “I see that Maltese are passionate about local football, but experience is limited. Having had the possibility of being the general manager of a club like Juventus, I believe to have the necessary experience to give Maltese clubs the push they need” continued Moggi.

    Would you see Moggi in Malta’s football scene? Would you agree that he is part of it? What are your thoughts?